Penis size; everyone has an opinion on the matter - even the odd lesbian!

But, does a bigger dick actually impact your sexual performance?

Should you shy away from communal showers if you’ve got a little one?

And, if you’ve got a Loch Ness monster, should you show it off?

These simple questions have stood the test of time.

But, despite our all-American proverb - ‘bigger is better’, there hasn’t always been such a desire for a larger penis size…

Ever seen a Greek statue depicting heroes or gods?

You may have noticed their penises are actually pretty small.

On the other hand, the statues of the drunkards and layabouts were depicted as having monster cocks!

Greek Statue Penis Sizes

Could this have been a plot to trick people into making smaller penises more acceptable?

Perhaps.

Point is, this debate has been raging on for thousands of years and it’s time to settle the matter once and for all.

“Does penis size matter?”

In this post, we’ll conclude the topic once and for all.

What Factors Should Be Considered?

Most people think the reason for wanting a bigger penis is down to sexual performance, but that’s a misconception.

There’s so much more to it than that…

Social Conditioning

It’s normal to compare yourself to others. We look at things we value and see who has the most of those qualities, then we determine a pecking order.

And, someone gets to be ‘top dog’.

Each species has its own metric, more often than not though, it’s the ability to win a fight.

As humans have evolved into a more civilised species, the value of strength alone has massively diminished.

Instead, we chose a bunch of other metrics, namely: aesthetic, wit, purpose and penis size.

In short, a more aesthetically pleasing partner will allow women to feel more accepted in social situations.

Being Wit (the capacity for inventive thought) is valuable because it shows you can fend off others through the use of verbal prowess, acting as a modern-day defence mechanism.

A sense of purpose gives people a feeling of consistency that the rug isn’t going to be pulled out under them - assuring them that everything will be okay.

Now, let’s talk about penis size.

Up till now, the attraction metrics we discussed were largely intangible. They appear to have a firm basis for why they exist.

However, penis size is a more complicated matter.

As we noted earlier, in ancient Greece, a smaller penis size was likely to have been sought after.

So, what’s changed?

Have women’s brains evolved in a couple of thousand years to start desiring bigger penises?

Unlikely.

Instead, the reason for this attraction is down to…men.

Yes, what a surprise, eh?!

You see, we all need a way to measure our status among others.

Unfortunately, in the society we live in, success is not measured absolutely, but relatively.

In a recent study, people were offered two options:

$100 but their friend gets $150

OR

$80 but their friend gets nothing

They tend to go for the second option even though they will be worse off.

As we’ve seen this decade, reality can be easily distorted by false news.

Although penis size may result in higher sexual satisfaction from women (we’ll come onto this later), we have as a society promoted the need for a having a bigger penis to such an extent that it has become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

After centuries of depicting larger penis sizes in media of being a high value trait, we have now accepted this belief into our dogma.

Now, the sight of a larger sized penis is so inextricably linked to the notion that it will be more sexually satisfying for women, that it now is.

We must now ask the question:

How important really is penis size?

How Important Really Is Penis Size?

To answer this, we must consider the following:

  1. Female Erogenous Zones
  2. Compare Penetrative Methods
  3. Vagina Size
  4. Sexual Competency

Female Erogenous Zones

In 2013, a study involving 800 women looked at erogenous zones around the body and the level of arousal that came about from their intimate touch.

Each body part was rated out of ten for how arousing it was when touched and the following table shows the top 10:

Female Erogenous ZonesAverage Arousal Level
Clitoris9.17
Vagina8.40
Mouth / Lips7.91
Nape of Neck7.51
Breasts7.35
Nipples7.35
Inner Thigh6.70
Back of Neck6.20
Ears5.06
Lower Back4.73

As we can see, the most erogenous zone for women is the clitoris followed closely by the vagina.

Those higher levels of sensitivity explain why stimulating these areas tend to result in an orgasm more than any of the other areas.

Orgasm appears to be most accessible by starting with less sensitive areas and building up to higher areas of sensitivity until a peak arousal state is achieved.

It is, however, extremely rare for women to be able to achieve climax without the use of clitoral or vaginal stimulation.

These non-genital areas can therefore, in-essence, be described as supportive zones.

Going beyond this, we must be aware that stimulation required to achieve peak arousal will differ between women. This may explain why some are unable to achieve this through vaginal stimulation alone.

A 2017 study found that 37% of women require clitoral stimulation to orgasm and a further 36% of women said that while they didn’t require clitoral stimulation to orgasm, it did enhance their experience.

However, with that mindset, it would be easy enough to dismiss the act of penetration as being unnecessary…

Why even bother penetrating the vagina when there’s so many other areas of the body that can be stimulated? And if the clitoris is the ‘final destination’ anyway, does it make penetration redundant?

Of course, most women will testify that the answer to this is ‘hell no’.

Although near to each other, the vagina and clitoris are anatomically different and have different nerve endings, providing different types of stimulus.

We can therefore deduce that whilst penetration is not the sole means of female satisfaction, it is an element than can significantly enhance pleasure levels.

Compare Penetrative Methods

Now that we’ve established the importance of penetration during sex, let’s now consider that there are a number of different forms of penetration for the purposes of sexual pleasure.

Is the penis the best form of penetration? If not, then the argument for a larger penis size would be very much diminished…

Fingers

The most apparent competitor to the penis is the finger with the main benefit being higher levels of dexterity and precision to target key areas.

While the penis can only really muster a simple forwards / backwards motion, the fingers are able to create a much greater variety of movements.

Additionally, there is also the option to swap fingers and therefore, increase or decrease thickness as necessary.

The main drawback of using fingers is there tends to be a limit to their size, leaving women wanting more.

Dildos

A dildo is effectively a penis replacement device. It is shaped to feel like a penis and therefore mimic the sensations that it causes.

The great thing about dildos is that they can be customised to match the needs of the woman - in terms of size, patterns and smoothness.

If you have a small penis size and don’t mind parking your ego to use a dildo on your partner, you may be able to provide her with even more pleasure.

Unfortunately, dildos have a sense of lifelessness and can sometimes be difficult to connect with.

Vibrators

Vibrators are effectively enhanced dildos that move and shake to create the illusion of having real sex.

They are highly customisable and as a result can significantly enhance a woman’s ability to climax.

This explains why 78% of adult women in the US own one.

As with dildos, if you don’t mind using one of these on your partner (rather than your penis), you can deliver some incredible results!

Penis

Lastly, let’s talk about using the penis.

Although it isn’t as dexterous as the fingers or as customisable as dildos and vibrators, the feeling of being penetrated by something ‘natural’ explains its draw.

When aroused, a penis often seems like it has a life of its own. A woman cannot control it.

Whilst the rhythmic bodily motions can be somewhat planned, the pulsing sensation cannot.

This lack of control taps into a woman’s primal desire to feel dominated which is extremely difficult to replicate through synthetic means.

By this logic, it would suggest that penetration through the use of the penis is actually rather important.

Vaginal Size

It doesn’t seem fair to point at penises and accuse them as being at fault for being unable to provide suitable pleasure because of their size.

Just as penises come in different shapes and sizes, so do vaginas.

It stands to logic then that women with bigger vaginas will enjoy smaller penises less and, conversely, those with smaller vaginas will find bigger penises uncomfortable.

As men, it’s easy to feel the pressure to increase your penis size with all of the attention this topic receives in the media.

However, many women also feel pressure to have a tight vagina.

If you’ve ever been to a female-led comedy club, you’ll quickly learn about how vaginas change after child-birth!

When you broaden the subject matter to genital size, rather than just penis size it can be very freeing to realise that everyone is different.

As such, if you have a smaller penis, there’s a good chance that there will be a woman out there who has a smaller vagina out there to match.

With that in mind, it’s not always easy to decide to pair up with someone based solely on the size of their vagina. It’s not like you can easily go around and ask them.

With men saying they’ve only had 14 partners in their lifetime (on average), it doesn’t give you many chances to strike lucky.

So, while vagina size can impact sexual pleasure levels for women, it’s better to have a bigger penis than not.

Sexual Competency

Lastly, and most importantly, we need to talk about sexual competency.

Even if you’ve got a penis that is the perfect match for the perfect woman, if you don’t know how to use it, you won’t be rocking anyone’s world.

After a number of discussions with women on the subject, there were 3 things that came up frequently, making someone good at sex: confidence, practice of positions and stamina.

Many women made clear they would much prefer to have sex with a guy who have a smaller sized penis, but knows how to perform sexually.

However, the best case situation would be to be with someone who has a big penis and knows what they are doing.

Conclusion: Does Size Matter?

To conclude, yes, penis size does matter.

However, not as much as you think.

There are plenty of ways to overcome having a small penis if you feel that it impedes you from satisfying your partner so there’s nothing to feel ashamed about.

Penis Size Questions

What’s The Average Penis Size?

In America, the average penis size is 5.1 inches.

Want to check out the average penis size around the world?

Click here to see the full worldwide listing.

Does Circumcision Affect Penis Size?

A foreskin can make your penis look slightly bulkier when it’s flaccid.

During an erection, the foreskin retracts and almost disappears, so it won’t affect how big your penis looks when it’s erect.

Does Hand/Shoe Size Impact Your Penis?

A 2015 study found a very weak correlation with other body dimensions.

However, the research methodologies used in those don’t hold up to scientific scrutiny.

Looking at someone’s size of hands or feet won’t give you an idea of their penis size.

Can I Make My Penis Bigger?

Yes.

There are many ways of increasing your penis size advertised online, but only one that has been clinically proven to work.

It’s called a penis extender device and works over a period of few months.

Click here to view our comparison of the top 5 penis extenders on the market right now.

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